Eric Myers Jazz

work in progress

 

ESSAYS

This section includes essays on various jazz subjects, written by a number of writers. Contributions are welcome. Writers interested in contributing are welcome to contact the editor by filling out the form in the CONTACT tab. Photographs to illustrate those essays are welcome. Readers can click on the INDEX button for a list of articles in this folder.

 
 Mick Kenny   

Mick Kenny

 

JIM KELLY & MICK KENNY: BACKBONE OF CROSSFIRE

by Eric Myers

Jazz Magazine, July/August, 1982

Crossfire is not just another Australian group. Formed in 1974, the band now has a longevity which makes it part of the establishment in Australian music. Over eight years, its personnel has been surprisingly stable. Mick Kenny (keyboards), Jim Kelly (guitar) and Ian Bloxsom (percussion) have been there since the beginning…

 Timothy Stevens

Timothy Stevens

GENESIS OF IDENTITY IN AUSTRALIAN IMPROVISED MUSIC

by Timothy Stevens

Conference of The Musicological Society of Australia, December 1, 2014

The thing with jazz, as we’re all told, is to sound like yourself. Jazz history has been most frequently related as a procession of great individuals, each of whom re-read the work of the predecessors in a slightly different, somehow new, fashion, and re-worked the music’s materials in a manner that was personal even while it demonstrated an abiding respect and regard for what had gone before. The great achievers in jazz were the ones who put the personal stamp on the music, who changed it…

 

 

 Len Barnard on cover of Jazz Magazine

Len Barnard on cover of Jazz Magazine

THE LEN BARNARD STORY

by Len Barnard

Jazz Magazine, 1981-82

In a recent conversation with Don Burrows, we both decided that the thirties in Australia were great years in which to grow up. I don’t expect everyone to enjoy reading reminiscences — but I have the usual wistful hopes. I arrived as the farthing was going out as viable currency, but half pennies were still reasonably capable. Coleslaw was totally unknown, and all the shops were a bit musty by present standards. Perhaps because there was no processed food…