Eric Myers Jazz

work in progress

 

ESSAYS

This section includes essays on various jazz subjects, written by a number of writers. Contributions are welcome. Writers interested in contributing are welcome to contact the editor by filling out the form in the CONTACT tab. Photographs to illustrate those essays are welcome. Readers can click on the INDEX button for a list of articles in this folder.

 
 Chris Qua  Photo credit Jane March

Chris Qua

Photo credit Jane March

CHRIS QUA

Interviewed by Mike Williams

Excerpt from book The Australian Jazz Explosion, 1981

The ascent of Galapagos Duck has been one of the great success stories of Australian jazz, a parallel to the music’s increasing acceptance by a wide public. With their refusal to be typecast, the members of the band have been able to attract many of the young people who in the 1970s became disillusioned with the naiveté of rock. They have pitched a vast number of stylistic elements into the melting-pot to produce music beyond facile categorisation. Like other Australian jazz musicians who have found high popularity, they are essentially communicators, establishing a bridge with their audience...

 Dave Panichi

Dave Panichi

AT THE SOURCE: DAVE PANICHI'S LIFE IN JAZZ

by Samuel Cottell

Musicandliterature.org, December 10, 2015

The shelves in Dave Panichi’s apartment are lined with texts on arranging, improvising, and music technique, and are littered with biographies of famous jazz musicians. The memoirs by Miles Davis and Tony Bennett are at the forefront. His personal recording collection represents a lifetime’s compendium of all the best the world has to offer in the jazz tradition. His trombone, an instrument that has been witness to history on many continents, sits on its stand waiting to be played…

 Buddy Rich

Buddy Rich

DAVE PANICHI & THE BUDDY RICH TAPE: I GOT NOTHIN’ FOR YOU

by Richard Cooke

The Monthly, July 2007

Dave Panichi is one of the greatest jazz trombonists Australia has produced. He is also the straight man in one of the greatest unintentional comedy routines ever recorded. "I could live to be 150 and cure cancer, and I'd still go down in history as the guy from the Buddy Rich tape," he says. "I've had cats in China ask me about it. I'm never going to live it down."