Eric Myers Jazz

work in progress

 

JAZZCHORD ARTICLES

Between 1993 and 2002, 64 editions of JazzChord were published by the Jazz Co-ordination Association of New South Wales. This folder includes a selection of articles from those editions. Articles published in JazzChord appear on this site also in the JOHN CLARE, JAZZ CO-ORDINATION, BOOK REVIEWS, CONTRIBUTIONS and OBITUARIES folders.

 
 Lars Thorborg

Lars Thorborg

VISIT OF LARS THORBORG TO AUSTRALIA

by Eric Myers

JazzChord, Apr/May, 2000

The big news from the National Jazz Development Office in early 2000 was its initiative in arranging for the music director of the Copenhagen Jazzhouse, Lars Thorborg, to visit Australia. This came about courtesy of assistance from the Audience Development section of the Australia Council. Thorborg was in Australia from February 26 to March 10, 2000. He spent five days in Adelaide at the Performing Arts Market (PAM), before going on to Sydney where he arrived on Fri Mar 3…

 L-R, Lars Thorborg, Etienne Sedwick

L-R, Lars Thorborg, Etienne Sedwick

IMPRESSIONS OF AN AUSTRALIAN VISIT

by Lars Thorborg

JazzChord, Jun/Jul, 2000

From February 26-March 10, 2000, I was very fortunate to visit Australia. I stayed in Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney. Here are some of my experiences and impressions. First of all I would like to say thanks to Eric Myers, the National Jazz Development Officer, for his invitation to visit Australia; Ian Scobie from the fourth Australian Performing Arts Market; and of course the Audience Development division of the Australia Council for their support...

 The Necks

The Necks

THE NECKS: A UNIQUE KIND OF SUCCESS

Eric Myers interviews Lloyd Swanton

JazzChord, Aug/Sep, 1999

The members of the Sydney trio The Necks have achieved a unique kind of success. Not only have they developed a substantial following in a number of Australian cities, regularly drawing audiences of between 200 and 400, but also, after beginning to perform in Europe only in 1998, are soon to commence their third tour there, and without subsidies from bodies such as the Australia Council. What is the explanation for this success, which is so unusual for a jazz-orientated trio?